Call Quality Insights


Last Updated: 07/14/2017 Back to Topic All Articles

Call quality insights can be found in the call flow panel in your call log.  This report will give a detailed analysis of network quality and audio levels detected during your call, and can provide very helpful information for troubleshooting network-related call quality problems.

Finding Call Quality Insights

To open the insights:
1) Navigate to Calls Call Log.
2) Open the call detail panel by clicking Edit on the left side of the call log, clicking the white space in any column of the call, or by clicking the call direction indicator in the Contact column.
3) Click the Call Flow tab on the left of the detail panel.
4) Click insights at the top of the Call Flow tab.
Finding Call Quality Insights

Reading Insights

The call quality insights page includes detailed network information and graphs to illustrate jitterMean Opinion Score (MOS)latencyaudio input levelaudio output level, and received packets lost.  The summary at the top of the page will show the measured values for each of these.  Problematic scores will be highlighted in red.

  • Jitter is the variation in latency across the network.  High jitter indicates bad network and adversely affects call quality.
  • MOS is a subjective measurement of call quality.  Low MOS (below 3.5) indicates poor call quality.
  • Latency: Round-Trip Time (RTT) is the length of time it takes for a packet to be sent plus the length of time it takes for an acknowledgement of that signal to be received.  High RTT could cause audio latency.
  • Audio Input Level is the the strength of the audio input signal from the client device.  This changes during a call.  Constant input level for a long period could be due to a muted microphone.
  • Audio Output Level is the strength of the audio output signal on the client device.  Unchanged audio output level could be due to a muted input from the other end or due to being placed on hold.
  • Received Packets Lost reflects packets of data failing to reach their destination.  Packet loss is typically caused by network congestion, and adversely affects call quality.

​Ideally, values like jitterlatency, and packet loss should be as low as possible.  If you have call quality issues or if some of your agents are having trouble receiving or making calls, check these values on calls where these issues occurred.  If you have high jitter, latency, or packet loss, contact your network administrator for assistance.

If you are experiencing issues with audio, such as not being able to hear the caller or the caller not being able to hear you, check the audio input and output levels.  If either value is at 0 for the duration of the call, audio input or output may be muted on your device.  Note that placing a call on hold will also set the audio to 0 for a time during the call.

Summary of information


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